Corn Shelling at WCAPC Show

So as I alluded to in the last post, a more in depth post about one subject at the West Central Antique Power Collectors show in Blomkest, MN was coming.  Here it is.

I arrived about an hour after the show started and it was not very busy yet.  The early morning rain pushed back the arrival times for many.  The exhibitors however we’re ready to exhibit.

While I was at the show I was wandering about with my camera.  A nice old gent by the name of Randy Mertz tipped me off that he was going to be shelling corn in a little while.

Some of you may know I grew up on a farm, but my family did not farm.   I had uncles and a grandfather that did, so I’m somewhat familiar with the common activities of farmers.  Shelling corn is one such activity.

Now days picking corn implies shelling it because that happens automatically when the combine harvests the corn.  Back when the equipment at the Blomkest show was in use, that is not how it happened.  Corn was picked and it stayed on the cob.  It was then stored in granaries, corn cribs and the like until it was needed.

At that time the farmer would shell the corn.  Shelling was the process of getting the kernels of corn separated from the cob.  In this state the corn could be sold or further processed into feed for livestock, etc.

Corn Sheller

Corn Sheller

This is the side the husks and cobs are ejected from.  The tractor on the right is powering the sheller with it’s PTO.

Randy Mertz feeds corn into the conveyer to be shelled.

Randy Mertz feeds corn into the conveyer to be shelled.

The corn begins it’s journey from the back of the green wagon as several look on.

Running river of corn

Running river of corn

Now it’s flowing nicely.

Corn goes up the elevator into the sheller

Corn goes up the elevator into the sheller

Here you see the corn leaving the conveyer dropping on the the sheller’s conveyer to be fed into the sheller.  On the left the shelled corn falls into the wagon.  On the right the cobs and husks are discarded.

Corn Dropping into the Sheller

The husks and cobs are spit neatly into separate piles.

The husks and cobs are spit neatly into separate piles.

A little closer look at the cobs and husks.

The final product

The final product

And finally the whole point of this exercise.  Corn all by itself, no husks, no cobs.

Thanks Randy for taking the time to exhibit so people like me who somewhat remember this stuff can see it again and especially for those who have no idea what shelling corn is.  If not for folks like you and the other exhibitors a lot of things once done on the farm could only be read about.

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